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What's a Vegan?



Sample Recipes

1) BBQ Pumpkin Sandwich

2) Mediterranean Tostada

3) Vegan Pumpkin Pie

4) Beet Cakes

5) Spinach Pasta Salad

6) Tomato Brazil Nut Soup

7) Olive Oil Pie Crust

8) Avo Maggie

9) Yam Coconut Curry Soup

10) Hummus with Lemon

11) Garlic Mushrooms

12) Steamed Artichokes


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Wildlife prints featuring birds of Horicon Marsh
Beautiful wildlife prints featuring birds of Horicon Marsh
Also visit HoriconBirds.com for beautiful wildlife photography from Pam Rotella!


Steamed Artichokes (serves 2)

In those restaurants good enough to offer steamed artichokes, you'll probably be given two dips on the side. One will be Dijon mustard, and the other will either be mayonnaise (in less expensive restaurants) or a garlic dip/oil (in better restaurants). As a part of this recipe, I've included instructions on making garlic-flavored oil. Finding a good brand of Dijon mustard is up to you.


Food you'll need
2 fresh artichokes
Water to steam artichokes
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 bulb of garlic, all cloves separated and peeled
1/4 cup Dijon mustard

Preparation (30 minutes)
Rinse artichokes thoroughly; place in covered pot with 1" water at the bottom. Bring water to a boil on high heat. Reduce heat to low and steam, covered, until 2-3 outer leaves are easily pulled from each artichoke (20-30 minutes or more, depending on size). Leave artichokes in the covered pot until ready to eat, to keep them warm.
While artichokes are steaming, sauté all garlic cloves in oil until tender; remove from heat and allow to cool slightly before serving. Remove artichokes from water and serve with garlic oil and Dijon mustard.

For artichoke novices, here's a brief lesson on how they are eaten:
Artichokes are fun to eat. Each leaf has a pricker on the end called a "claw". To eat outer artichoke leaves, pull each leaf from the artichoke by the claw end, then dip the other (soft) end into garlic oil or mustard. Scrape off the soft, edible part from the bottom of the leaf with your teeth, then discard the tough upper leaf. As you come closer to the center of the artichoke, more of the leaf becomes edible. Some people discard most of the outer leaves, and start eating when roughly half of the leaves are a lighter green or yellow color (indicating they're softer). When you finally come to the center or "heart" of the artichoke, the base can be broken into pieces, dipped, and eaten just like the leaves. In fact, when you purchase canned artichoke hearts, the small innermost leaves and the base are what you're getting. For a few dip recipes using blended artichoke hearts, see Chapter 9.


from Chapter 10: Appetizers, side dishes, and rice

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